Un-uninstallable software

Imagine if you bought a vacuum cleaner, it broke, but you couldn’t throw it out. It became bad hardware, malware, ruining your life, sneaking around, tripping you on stairs, eating your food, and checking out your spouse.

Imagine if you bought a vacuum cleaner, it broke, but you couldn’t throw it out. It became bad hardware, malware, ruining your life, sneaking around, tripping you on stairs, eating your food, and checking out your spouse.

Software that you can’t uninstall is just as bad. Why don’t reviews deal with this aspect of any software?

I don’t know how bad it is in Linux and Mac world, but just from my own experience, it is almost a given in the Windows world. You either live with old stuff you don’t use (and could even be taking up CPU and storage bandwidth) or you attempt to follow arcane procedures dealing with the Registry and advanced Yogic postures while rebooting hundreds of times.

Maybe we should reverse charge the vendors and yes even open source organizations a fee for using our systems as backup installations. Is un-uninstallable software malware, criminal?

This is mostly a payware issue. For example, I have some trial software that is uninstallable, like Acronis backup thing. But, this is not just a payware thing. I once installed the JDK 1.6.0.23 on a system. The install folder got wiped accidentally, but now it won’t reinstall, even after going through the Registry to clean out old references. Can you imagine the “normal” user, the ones who use the DVD tray for a cup-holder, what they go through?

Further Reading
Faustian descent into backup hell: A play in two acts

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